Greenwood daytona corvette




Greenwood daytona corvette

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  • The last three series – the Turbo GT, Daytona and GTO – all used turbocharged small block engines. Often mistaken for a Greenwood design (and the reason for including them here), the Can Am somewhat resembled a cross between a Sebring GT and Turbo GT. The five styles were, in.

    John Greenwood Corvettes - Turbo Daytona. Daytona prototype. Daytona # Daytona # Daytona # Daytona.

    Using the same body that John Greenwood used on his GT racer, the Daytona Corvette was as close to an IMSA racer for the street as.

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    The rear of that is butt ugly. Test lab 61, a Corvette split-window coupe that possibly GM never intended to let go. Gearing up to accomodate the new rule changes brought about by IMSA, the Greenwoods incorporated a few updates into this last Daytona before the changeover to the GTO body style. One of these with aot of motor, rec wheels, Recaros and the bodywork completed there should be screens on the backside of all those fenders and brake duct cooling and some wild wild paint. I bet it has TriPower!

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    Greenwood Corvette - Daytona Gallery

    With the passing of John Greenwood on July 7, , many have stopped to look back on his fascinating career. We all wish John had won more races, but he sure kept things exciting. From to Greenwood created five unique, custom-built super-Vettes in limited quantities: Of the five cars, the Daytona was absolutely the wildest. Each car was unique and has a story to tell.

    So over the next four generational cycles of The Illustrated Corvette Designer Series we will be covering the Greenwood specialty Corvettes. But when the European factory race cars got the upper hand, the cars got very complex.

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    Race car builders are clever fellows and always employ the tactic: So John pushed everything to the max. Since , when the last street Daytona Corvette was built, so many stunning specialty and tuner Corvettes have been offered, the Greenwood cars are kind of forgotten.

    The lineage of all of the Greenwood specialty Corvettes goes back to the Randy Wittine-designed C3 widebody kit, designed to allow Corvette racers, such as Greenwood, to take advantage of the new super-wide racing slicks.

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    John introduced the new widebody Corvette to the racing world in , wearing stars and stripes all around its new wild, wide flanks. Five Daytonas were built in and Unlike the purpose-built, tube-frame Trans-Am cars, the Daytonas were built on new, production Corvettes. The Daytona used the stock L48 engine for its low 8.

    All five Daytonas had high-performance automatic transmissions. Greenwood not only built Corvette race cars, he designed and developed his trademarked five-link suspension for Corvettes that eliminated squat and lift, and then sold Greenwood suspension kits to Corvette racers.

    The five-link, coilover suspension for the production frame and drivetrain was an option that was ordered on two of the five Daytonas built. Even without the optional race car rear suspension, Daytonas had Bilstein gas shocks, needle bearings on the idler arm, larger-diameter antisway bars and a performance version of the steering box. Only two Daytonas and had the racing five-link coilover rear suspension while the other three had enhanced stock suspensions.

    Greenwood daytona corvette

    The BBS three-piece racing wheels with their Kevlar brake fans—15x8 on the front and 15x10 on the rear—were shod with Goodyear Wingfoot tires. The back of the front fender pontoon is vented and sloped forward, matching the vent angle of the production fender.

    The side rocker is out to the outer edges of the front and rear fender pontoons. On the race car, what look like side skirts or running boards, is the cover for the side pipes, but with an oval opening just ahead of the rear wheels for the collector exit. The tops of the front fenders, inboard of the top fender crease, had louvered vents to reduce air pressure. The hood had NACA ducts, was raised for clearance of the turbo setup and vents at the back.

    Heavily Modified Corvette GreenWood Daytona



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